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THIS IS THE REMOTE OPTION


One month after the Sugarhill Gang’s 1979 record “Rapper’s Delight” introduced hip-hop to a national audience, three New York Jewish men under the moniker Steve Gordon & The Kosher Five recorded the first rap parody record, a Yiddish-accented humorous skit full of American Jewish cultural tropes set to a funky disco beat. This track may have been a one-off joke among friends, but it stands as the first in a long line of Jewish parody rap records that use hip-hop and humor to explore American Jewish identity and stereotypes of Jewish masculinity. This talk traces key moments in the history of Jewish parody rap and situates them in relation to broader contexts of historical Black-Jewish musical relations.
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Dates Dates: Friday, April 28 | 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 79 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
THIS IS THE REMOTE OPTION

The twenty-first century understanding of Pan-Africanism remains exclusively tied to the African continent, specifically leaving out Afro-diasporic subjects, especially in Europe. Today, a new movement of Black European youths are fighting against racial discrimination and for an Afro-European political identity. Afro-European Pan-Africanism as marking new diasporic linkages and movements of Black Europeans of African and Afro-Caribbean descent.
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Dates Dates: Tuesday, May 2 | 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 80 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
THIS IS THE REMOTE OPTION

Why does it seem like there are so many more transgender people today than there were ten years ago? Where were they before Caitlyn Jenner and Laverne Cox became regular fixtures on TV? This lecture will take an historical approach to answering these questions, starting with an overview of what it means to be a member of the transgender community today then looking back through history at how that has shifted over time. From the stars of the 1870s vaudeville stage to multi-decade-long debates within the American Psychiatric Association to activists in the gay rights movement, the presentation will weave together stories of key figures in U.S. transgender history and the broader cultural and political shifts that paved the way for Caitlyn and Laverne to come into the national spotlight.
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Dates Dates: Thursday, May 11 | 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 80 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
The relationship between the oral and written Torahs – the Biblical text and the commentaries that came later – is a central concern of Jewish religious thought. The Talmudic text of Mishnah Hagiga 1:8 provides categories for conceptualizing this relationship. One of these categories is laws akin to “mountains hanging by a string”. Join us as we explore what this term means and what it tells us about rabbinic conception of the two Torahs. More
Dates Dates: Thursday, May 25 | 7 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 80 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
One month after the Sugarhill Gang’s 1979 record “Rapper’s Delight” introduced hip-hop to a national audience, three New York Jewish men under the moniker Steve Gordon & The Kosher Five recorded the first rap parody record, a Yiddish-accented humorous skit full of American Jewish cultural tropes set to a funky disco beat. This track may have been a one-off joke among friends, but it stands as the first in a long line of Jewish parody rap records that use hip-hop and humor to explore American Jewish identity and stereotypes of Jewish masculinity. This talk traces key moments in the history of Jewish parody rap and situates them in relation to broader contexts of historical Black-Jewish musical relations. More
Dates Dates: Friday, April 28 | 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 80 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
SIEGAL LIFELONG LEARNING’S ANNUAL WEEK OF LEARNING WITH MICHAL BAR-ASHER SIEGAL Horace Goldsmith Visiting Associate Professor in Judaic Studies, Yale University Associate Professor, The Goldstein-Goren Department of Jewish Thought, Ben Gurion University of the Negev SUNDAY, MAY 21–THURSDAY, MAY 25, 2023 More
Dates Dates: SUNDAY, MAY 21–THURSDAY, MAY 25, 2023
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 60 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 60 seats
Bundle Courses Bundle Courses: 3
 
In this four-week session, we’ll read some of the most iconic and unforgettable Ukrainian-Jewish writers and poets including Isaac Babel, Der Nister, Lidiya Ginzburg, among others. Religious and secular, written in Russian or Yiddish, these works bring the old world roaring back with humor, wisdom, tragedy, dreams, eros, and above all, a rich Jewish history. Keeping Ukraine and its people in our hearts and minds will be both a balm and a tribute in this difficult time. Readings will be distributed before class. More
Dates Dates: Tuesdays, May 9–30 | 7–8:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 30 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
 
Abraham Joshua Heschel was one of the most compelling Jewish theologians of the 20th century. Known for his beautiful prose, he has influenced generations of Jews and their spiritual leaders through his writing, his teaching, and his personal example. Heschel is also widely admired for his vocal political activism against racism and the war in Vietnam, to which he devoted much of his time during the 1960s. What is the deeper philosophical and spiritual connection between Heschel’s philosophy of Judaism, his analysis of Jewish piety and his political commitments? How can religious education cultivate moral sensitivity? And how should religious leaders speak to moral concerns of their own time? Jewish Studies programming is supported by the Fund for the Jewish Future of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, and The Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland. More
Dates Dates: Tuesdays, January 31–February 28 (no class February 21) 7–8:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: Closed
Class Size Class size: 25 seats
Closed Enrollment
 
Save the date. Details forthcoming. More
Dates Dates: Monday, April 24 | 9:30 a.m.–2 p.m.
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 100 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 100 seats
 
The Association for Continuing Education is a volunteer organization dedicated to providing and supporting continuing education programs in cooperation with the Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University.



Membership is open to those who love to learn. ACE independently provides the Grazella Shepherd Lecture Day, Discussion Day, Acclaimed Authors Luncheon and the Annual Book Sale, trips, a semi-annual newsletter and a summer luncheon series featuring local authors.
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Dates Dates: September 1, 2022 - August 31, 2023
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 538 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 700 seats
 
In the decades just after World War II, many American Jews enjoyed rapid upward
mobility. But instead of celebrating their economic rise, many rabbis, writers and Jewish intellectuals expressed concern that Jewish life could not survive the move to the middle class suburbs. This talk will examine this undercurrent of anxiety, and what it revealed about the hopes, fears and ambitions of American Jews in the middle of the 20th century. This talk is based on Kranson’s book Ambivalent Embrace: Jewish Upward Mobility in Postwar America.
 

Jewish Studies programming is supported by the Fund for the Jewish Future of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, and The Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland.
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Dates Dates: Friday, March 10 | noon–1:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 59 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
The twenty-first century understanding of Pan-Africanism remains exclusively tied to the African continent, specifically leaving out Afro-diasporic subjects, especially in Europe. Today, a new movement of Black European youths are fighting against racial discrimination and for an Afro-European political identity. Afro-European Pan-Africanism as marking new diasporic linkages and movements of Black Europeans of African and Afro-Caribbean descent. More
Dates Dates: Tuesday, May 2 | 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 80 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
This course analyzes significant events of the 1950s including the growth of the middle class, the move to suburbia, development of new industries, the emergence of television and creation of the national highway system. Racial events covered include the Montgomery bus boycott, Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Brown school decision and the anti-communist anxiety of the era reflected in the blacklist and McCarthyism. Internationally, we’ll review U.S. assumption of world leadership, the Cold War, the Korean War, nuclear policy, and covert CIA operations in other countries. The politics of the era include the Eisenhower-Stevenson and Kennedy- Nixon contests. Class discussion will compare the 1950s with life today and the impact of that decade on the world in which we live now. Read: The Fifties, David Halberstam This course is offered with the generous support of the Association for Continuing Education. More
Dates Dates: Fridays, April 7–May 26 | 10:30 a.m.– noon ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 24 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 25 seats
 
Liberal, religious Jews strongly advocated for legal abortion between the 1970s and the turn of the twentyfirst century. Why did they do so, and on what grounds? Join Dr. Rachel Kranson as she shares from her ongoing research: Religious Misconceptions: American Jews and the Politics of Abortion. Drawing on archival collections, she will tell the story of the American Jewish lawyers who developed the argument that abortion should be protected by the guarantees of the first amendment of the constitution. Understanding this history has become even more important as the US enters a post-Roe era, and experts are looking for new legal avenues through which to protect reproductive freedom.

Jewish Studies programming is supported by the Fund for the Jewish Future of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, and The Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland.
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Dates Dates: Thursday, March 9 | 7–8:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 54 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
One of the most remarkable features of medieval Hebrew manuscripts is the inclusion of striking zoocephalic figures: humans with beastly and bestial heads. This lecture will explore several such manuscripts suggesting that the presence of these figures, peculiar to medieval Ashkenazi books, lies at the intersection of image, language, philosophy, poetry and history


Jewish Studies programming is supported by the Fund for the Jewish Future of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, and The Laura and Alvin Siegal College of Judaic Studies Educational Foundation, a supporting foundation of the Jewish Federation of Cleveland.
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Dates Dates: Sunday, February 12 | 2–3:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 53 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
The Gilded Age, which extended from about 1870 to 1900, was a period of extraordinary growth and social transformation in America, which also produced some of the superstars of American art—among them Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, James McNeill Whistler, John Singer Sargent and John La Farge. This class will survey the work of these figures, and the ways in which they portrayed both the triumphs and anxieties of this remarkable period. More
Dates Dates: Tuesdays, March 21–April 25 | 1:30–3:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 19 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
How is it that humankind’s “best friend” evolved from the same mammal order as lions, tigers and bears? Canis familiaris has a huge range of physical characteristics. But the bridge from predatory wolf to human companion is in dogs’ behavior. How was this bridge crossed? Did wolves follow humans to eat their garbage? Did children adopt wolf cubs? Did humans co-opt wolves’ hunting behavior, forming a co-evolutionary matrix that changed our bodies and theirs? What does it mean at a practical level for those of us who still share their lives with dogs. More
Dates Dates: Thursday, February 23 | 10-11:30 a.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 28 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
This course will explore the different habitats available to migrating birds at the university farms. Students should be prepared to walk at a moderate pace over some hilly and possibly wet terrain. Binoculars are recommended. Meet in the Greenhouse parking lot. Listening devices available. More
Dates Dates: Fridays, May 5–June 9 | 7–9 a.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 19 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 20 seats
 
The Chemistry prize was awarded to 3 scientists, Carolyn R. Bertozzi, Morten Meldal, and K. Barry Sharpless, for developing a way of “snapping molecules together.” They found an ingenious and environmentally cleaner way to build molecules that the Nobel panel said is “already benefiting humankind greatly.” More
Dates Dates: Friday, June 2 | 11 a.m.–12:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 80 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 80 seats
 
Though most famous for Moby Dick, Herman Melville also wrote compelling sketches, short stories, and novels, including: the ten sketches that comprise The Encantadas, or The Enchanted Isles (1854), the novella Benito Cereno (1855), and the novel Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846). As with his magnum opus, Melville’s shorter fiction draws not only on his eighteen-month voyage to the South Seas on whaling and trading vessels but also on historical sources. The mysterious desolation of the Galapagos Islands, the commandeering of a Spanish slave ship off the southern tip of Chile by its enslaved cargo, and the exotic sexual mores and cannibalism on Nuku Hiva are some of the provocative topics in Melville’s ethnographic, historical, and imaginative shorter works. All aboard for Herman Melville’s reconsideration of Romantic notions of the noble savage and the divinity of the natural world!

Read: The Encantadas, or Enchanted Isles, Benito Cereno, and select passages from the novel Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life (1846). All works are in the public domain and available at gutenberg.org.
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Dates Dates: Mondays, April 3–May 8 | 10–11:30 a.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 29 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
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